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Great post by Anil Dash on how the board of directors for an organization actually works. I learned a lot. The timing of this post could not be more perfect for me right now.

Manton Reece

22 Jun 2024 at 18:55
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Manton Reece: "I really dislike the Mastodon setting to require HTTP signatures for everything. It makes basic features like just grabbing some JSON for an actor more difficult. The user’s profile is on the public web anyway! We need apps that work natively with the web on its own terms, not more protocol layers."
Scripting News

22 Jun 2024 at 18:47
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Still no option for me to submit our Threads feature to Meta for review. Tried contacting developer support but that submission fails for unknown reasons. The issue seems to be that the Meta dev dashboard is not recognizing all the successful API calls we are already making.

Manton Reece

22 Jun 2024 at 18:32
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To people who say you get wrong answers from ChatGPT, if I wanted my car to kill me I could drive into oncoming traffic. That's the problem with reporters discovering ChatGPT gives incorrect answers. So does Google. As do reporters.

Dave's famous linkblog

22 Jun 2024 at 17:55
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There are 2 kinds of people: Those who find AI absolutely revolutionary and indispensable and integral to their workflows, and those who haven't learned how to use it yet. #amen

Dave's famous linkblog

22 Jun 2024 at 17:46
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I really dislike the Mastodon setting to require HTTP signatures for everything. It makes basic features like just grabbing some JSON for an actor more difficult. The user’s profile is on the public web anyway! We need apps that work natively with the web on its own terms, not more protocol layers.

Manton Reece

22 Jun 2024 at 17:37
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Perplexity CEO addresses the recent questions about crawling, but I don’t think his answers are going to satisfy anyone. He is partially correct, though, that there is confusion about crawling to train models vs. ad-hoc downloading web pages. New info is that they outsource some crawling, which seems bad if that’s your core business. Seems fixable.

Manton Reece

22 Jun 2024 at 16:46

Albert Camus on How to Live Whole in a Broken World

 Albert Camus on How to Live Whole in a Broken World

Born into a World War to live through another, Albert Camus (November 7, 1913–January 4, 1960) died in a car crash with an unused train ticket to the same destination in his pocket. Just three years earlier, he had become the second-youngest laureate of the Nobel Prize, awarded him for literature that “with clear-sighted earnestness illuminates the problems of the human conscience” — problems like art as resistance, happiness as our moral obligation, and the measure of strength through difficult times.

During WWII, Camus stood passionately on the side of justice; during the Cold War, he sliced through the Iron Curtain with all the humanistic force of simple kindness. But as he watched the world burn its own future in the fiery pit of politics, he understood that time, which has no right side and no wring side, is only ever won or lost on the smallest and most personal scale: absolute presence with one’s own life, rooted in the belief that “real generosity toward the future lies in giving all to the present.”

Camus addresses this with poetic poignancy in an essay titled “The Wrong Side and the Right Side,” found in his altogether superb posthumous collection Lyrical and Critical Essays (public library).

Albert Camus

In a prescient admonition against our modern cult of productivity, which plunders our capacity for presence, Camus writes:

Life is short, and it is sinful to waste one’s time. They say I’m active. But being active is still wasting one’s time, if in doing one loses oneself. Today is a resting time, and my heart goes off in search of itself. If an anguish still clutches me, it’s when I feel this impalpable moment slip through my fingers like quicksilver… At the moment, my whole kingdom is of this world. This sun and these shadows, this warmth and this cold rising from the depths of the air: why wonder if something is dying or if men suffer, since everything is written on this window where the sun sheds its plenty as a greeting to my pity?

Echoing the young Dostoyevsky’s exultant reckoning with the meaning of life shortly after his death sentence was repealed (“To be a human being among people and to remain one forever, no matter in what circumstances, not to grow despondent and not to lose heart,” Dostoyevsky wrote to his brother, “that’s what life is all about, that’s its task.”), Camus adds:

What counts is to be human and simple. No, what counts is to be true, and then everything fits in, humanity and simplicity. When am I truer than when I am the world?… What I wish for now is no longer happiness but simply awareness… I hold onto the world with every gesture, to men with all my gratitude and pity. I do not want to choose between the right and wrong sides of the world, and I do not like a choice… The great courage is still to gaze as squarely at the light as at death. Besides, how can I define the link that leads from this all-consuming love of life to this secret despair?… In spite of much searching, this is all I know.

These reflections led Camus to conclude that “there is no love of life without despair of life”; out of them he drew his three antidotes to the absurdity of life and the crucial question at its center.

Couple with George Saunders — who may be the closest we have to Camus in our time — on how to love the world more, then revisit Wendell Berry’s poetic antidote to despair.


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22 Jun 2024 at 15:51
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