More on comments, platforms and the indieweb

Colin Devroe wrote a thorough and thought-provoking response to my most recent musings on replies and comments. I would urge you to check it out.

He makes some very interesting and compelling points while outlining his particular answer to the question about comments.

One such point is that he doesn't like micro.blog becoming a comment platform that every reply has to be sent or received via, otherwise it's akin to a silo and you might as well just use Twitter.

It's an interesting angle.

I've likened it to a comment platform myself but one that's not like a social silo but a feed reader with an inbuilt two-way communication system.

If all you could do was list and reply to posts from blogs hosted with the service then it would, indeed, be considered a silo. Being able to add any RSS or JSON feed to your account, however, opens it up but Colin's objection is still well articulated and I can certainly see his point.

Forcing people to interact via only one avenue is bad for conversation and bad for the web.

I'm personally guilty of limiting my reader's options (although I am reconsidering this) but, if you are using micro.blog as a comment platform it means that your site accepts webmentions which can obviously originate from anywhere able to send them.

It's a shame this isn't more widespread.

But what really got me thinking was Colin's observation:

"I do have a M.b account but I’m beginning to wonder if I need one as I have my own fully functional weblog."

That's both perfect and prophetic.

Ideally, this is the open web's goal: for people not to need something like micro.blog; for connective technologies to be sufficiently simple and widespread that ideas can be posted and conversations had between any site regardless of platform or hosting.

I think something like micro.blog is a stepping stone, a proof of concept, if you will. Because the web is so dominated by platforms and silos we need it (or, rather, a familiar platform-style service) to serve as an effective illustration of how blogs in different locations can be truly connected and interact directly with each other via #indieweb style technologies.

Whether that is the way it will ultimately pan out remains to be seen but, as things stand, it is an elegant solution as long as you're willing to work within its limits.

It's not ideal but, if it gets people interested in blogging again and plants the seeds of a more connected open web, I'm all for it.

  1. manton says: #
    @colinwalker Your phrase “stepping stone” is exactly right. There is plenty still to do, but I hope that Micro.blog gets a few things right that will push things forward.
    →†’