It’s not the words but what they represent

"Writing is more than the singular act of putting words on the page" - me.

We are constantly reminded that writing is, in fact, multiple, distinct processes. Steps on the journey from beginning to end.

No matter how closely those steps fall, or how short any one of them may be, they are still there:

  • Ideation
  • Creation
  • Publication

I've taken a slight liberty with the nomenclature but they amount to: the formulation of ideas, drafting those ideas into "works" and ensuring they are fit for publication (editing) before finally hitting the button.

But look at them.

They look so ugly and awkward when laid out like that, too rigid for such a beautiful process.

Made up

Ideation is such a crappy word. It sounds made up in an "I'm trying to be smart" kind of way.

The bastard love child desperately seeking affection from resentful parents both regretting the illicit tryst that created it.

But, remember, all words are made up words. Someone, somewhere, at some time, first made them, first used them and ascribed them meaning.

Not all can be as elegant as those penned by Shakespeare but if they sound right they stick, spread, morph.

That's how language is formed.

Words, language, they are our means to express, describe, interpret, but sometimes the words we have are not enough.

Sometimes things seem so special, so unique, so overwhelming that we feel our words cannot possibly do them justice.

We stand back in awe wishing we could communicate just how we feel, wishing we could share this exact experience with others.

But we can't. We don't have the means.

And that's when new words, new phrases get created. In our desperation we find new ways, apparent nonsense that somehow perfectly encapsulates the moment.

They can seem stupid at first but they are symbolic, more an expression of an idea - an emotional mnemonic.

But once we unlock their meaning, internalise them, we see what lies behind and recognise it within ourselves.