1/5/20203

# Comments

James Shelley makes a very welcome return to his blog saying "We are not all in this together." It's a very sobering reminder of the differences and inequalities that exist in our societies.

He's absolutely right, even on a hyper-local scale there is such differentiation.

Within my own household there is a difference: my wife is considered at risk so has to take extra precautions beyond the rest of the household, although those precautions are technically extended to the rest of us by proxy. When my daughter was provisionally diagnosed we had to go into self-isolation so that's a different set of circumstances to the "norm".

Our neighbour one way is a mental health nurse so is still having to go out to work and visit patients whereas our neighbours on the other side are elderly so observing the government's recommendation to stay home for 12 weeks.

This is all different for three houses who would all be normally considered privileged, never mind those who may be disadvantaged in some way.

The UK war cry is "Stay at home, Protect the NHS, Save Lives' but obviously, not everyone can. Those that are have very differing circumstances.

The "all in this together" mantra is the same as during the times of financial austerity over the past few years and it didn't ring true then.

We're all 'affected' to one degree or another but we're certainly not facing the same problems.

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# Comments

We had to go food shopping earlier and were disgusted by the attitude of some people. The shop had lines on the floor taped 2 meters apart but numerous people were being impatient and barging past - definitely not adhering to social distancing rules.

At one point we were looking in a freezer when a man walked straight up to us and stood right next to my wife leaning over to reach something rather than being patient and waiting his turn.

I know that some people are starting to get tired of, and frustrated by, lockdown but there's no excuse for that type of behaviour.

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